My First Transatlantic Mediumwave Catch

I first heard of long distance mediumwave DX from the pages of Monitoring Times in the mid 90s, when they mentioned a fellow in the Pacific Northwest who, equipped with his Drake R8 and a Beverage antenna, was hearing mediumwave stations out of India and Japan. I had no idea this was even possible until this point, and was immediately fascinated by the idea.

A few years later, I discovered Werner Funkenhauser’s WHAMLOG, as well as Mark Connelly’sĀ Your First 50 Trans-Atlantic Countries, which was like pouring gasoline on a fire. From that point on, I was bound and determined to hear a mediumwave station from overseas, but it never happened. My noisy QTH of Baltimore City and a lack of serious antennas did me no favors, plus I was rarely available during evening grayline, the best TA hunting hours. I figured when I moved to Iowa, my chances of hearing anything would be slim to none. TA signals rapidly drop in strength as you move inland from the coast, and figured I’d have to go on some sort of DXpedition to a quiet coastal location in order to hear anything at all.

Enter Tim Tromp, and his YouTube channelĀ Kilokat7. In my opinion, Tim has become one of the best DXers in North America, and his YouTube channel backs that up. His short Beverage and D-Kaz antennas produce nothing short of amazing results, including mediumwave catches from the South Pacific and Australia. His knowledge of the bands are second to none. Most importantly though, he’s a land-locked Midwesterner just like me, DXing from the state of Michigan. So it was possible after all!

Last night, I found myself in front of the radios, trying to avoid the debate ant the Cubs game. The shortwave conditions were terrible, so I decided to go and play around on the broadcast band for a while. It didn’t take long for me to notice a couple of odd blips on the spectrum in between the North American 10 kHz spacing, but i didn’t think too much of it. My location is prone to false images (there’s a large metal machine shed about 100′ from my antenna), but I don’t usually see them at night. these were also lining up perfectly with the 9 kHz split frequencies used outside of North America. I settled on one that seemed to be relatively in the clear on 1053 and started playing with the filters. Lo and behold, I got this:

Of course I immediately message Tim, who tells me that what I’m hearing it Libya. Yes, THAT Libya! After years of trying, I’d finally bagged my first TA catch from about 6000 miles away. Score!

What is really interesting about this is that neither Libya or Central Iowa was in the grayline at that time, as you can see from the DX Toolbox map I pulled up. I can’t think of any propagation mechanism that would get a signal this far inland at that time, but that’s the beauty of radio, isn’t it? You just never really know what you’re going to hear, do you?

In addition to Libya on 1053, I got some fragments of audio from something on 747 kHz, but I’ll have to hear that one again to see if there’s anything really there.