A Review of the Sony ICF-EX5MkII

I find that a lot of things I buy today have their roots deep in my past. Whether it be pocket knives, watches, or yes, radios, they can all be traced back to either a childhood desire or some other want that went unfulfilled at the time. This radio is no exception.

The Sony EX5 is a radio that’s intrigued me ever since I heard about it on Radio Netherlands Media Network. This radio, featuring an analog, linear AM dial and a synch detector, was reported to be a very hot performer on mediumwave, but it was also available only in the Japanese market. After toying with the idea of trying to get a friend of mine in Japan to pick one up, I resigned myself to the fact I would never get my paws on one.

Fast forward to a few weeks ago,  when I am looking at the many different  eBay options available for obtaining this radio, all promising to deliver withing 10 to 21 days. Before hitting the buy now though, I decide to do a quick check of Amazon to see if there are any available there. Not only do they carry them, they’re cheaper than eBay and are eligible for two day delivery! I quickly add the radio to the cart, and within a few days, I had a brand new Sony ICF-EX5 MkII sitting on my desk. Thank you, internet!

First Impressions

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The Sony ICF-EX5MkII, right after unboxing.

The radio comes ready to use, with a carrying strap, four C size batteries, and a manual and warranty card, both of which are written in Japanese. It should be noted that the radio does not come with an AC adapter, which is fine, as it wouldn’t fit an American outlet anyway. If if you want to use this radio with AC power though, you’ll need a 6v adapter to make it happen. FYI.

I did notice that my particular unit at least is that the tuning knob seemed to ‘catch’ as it turned. I do not know if this is common with all units or not (who knows, maybe it’s a feature that’s addressed in the manual?), but I solved the problem by gently pulling the tuning knob out about an 8th of an inch, which solved the problem with no other issues.

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The EX5MkII next to the SupeRadio II

One of the first things that grabbed me about this radio is that it is fairly compact, especially compared to some of the portables I’m used to. Measuring in about 10.5 inches long, 5.5 inches tall, and maybe 2.5 inches wide, I’d guess it’s a little smaller than a Sony 2010, quite a bit smaller than any of the SupeRadios, and downright minuscule when compared to the behemoth that is the Satellit 800. The C batteries, while not as common as their bigger D sized brothers, help to keep the size and weight down, making this radio a great choice for a quick DXpedition to the beach, your local park, or anywhere else that’s away from electrical interference.

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Cubs win! sounds good on any radio.  Note the small turntable the radio is on. 

Since the radio arrived, I’ve spent a lot of enjoyable evenings out on the patio with this radio exploring the AM dial, and putting it through its paces. Like most Sonys, this radio has very nice audio, with an upper and lower tone adjustment switch to tailor your listening preferences. Not as handy as separate bass and treble controls, but still a nice feature for a radio this compact.

The Linear Dial

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A close up of the linear dial on the Sony EX5 MkII.

Maybe my analog radio skills are rusty, but I am surprised at how long it’s taken me to get used to the linear dial on this radio. Unlike most analog dials, which stretch out the lower frequencies while crunching the higher ones closer together, this radio has uniform spacing from the left hand of the dial to the right. While it seems like an easy adjustment(it’s really no different than the Hammarlund or Collins in the shack), I’ve struggled with it. I continually find myself going back to known stations to get a bearing on where I’m really at, and then feeling my way up or down to my target station. This is something that one goes through with every new analog portable though regardless of how the dial is configured, it just seems like more of an adjustment with this radio than others. Your mileage may vary.

That Synch Detector!

My location is about fifty miles away from WHO radio and their 50 KW transmitters on 1040 kHz.  This makes 1030 AM a great test for any radio or antenna system, and it’s where I started with the EX5. Finding WHO on the dial, I slowly made my way down to 1030. I could hear a couple of different stations with the radio turned to null out the WHO transmitters, but I was still getting a fair amount of splatter from WHO’s lower sideband. It’s here where the synch detector on this radio shines! A flip of a switch, and 90% of the splatter disappears, revealing a couple of weak stations someone so fittingly described as “in the soup.” I recognized one of the voices in that jumbled up mess as that of Dan Rea, the host of WBZ’s Nightside program out of Boston. I performed a similar test on 650 AM, where I managed to hear Eddie Stubbs’ music program on WSM in spite of the local WOI on 640. Neither of these tests were much of a challenge for the Sony and it’s synch detector.

Unlike a lot of synch detectors I’ve experienced, which take a moment or two to lock and may have to reacquire the carrier from time to time, this one seems to lock on instantaneously and never lets go. That’s a great thing to have when you’re trying to get an ID on a weak, fluttery station coming in from who knows where. In these cases, the synch detector minimizes the flutter and washing of the signal, and gets you the clearest reception possible. Nicely done, Sony.

What else?

Did you notice the red light in the tuning indicator? That little light not only makes the indicator easier to see, but it also doubles as a tuning indicator. The brighter the light, the more in tune you are with the station, sort of reminiscent of the old Sony Earth Orbiter. It can also double as a signal strength meter of sorts as well, which comes in handy when you’re using a tuned loop, or some other external antenna that couples with the radio via the internal ferrite rod.  One thing that I do find missing though is a dial light. Yes, I know, that’s what they make flashlights for, but it would still be a nice addition to what is already a very fine radio.

I have no idea how this radio performs on FM as I’ve never bothered to give it a try. I have heard reports of the dial being off a few MHz on FM though, so if this is a concern to you, keep it in mind. I haven’t tried the Radio Nikkei reception just yet either, but that will definitely happen sooner or later. Once i get bored enough to hook this thing up to the SAL,  I’m sure I’ll hear both Nikkei 1 and 2 on 3925 and 3945 with no problem. And yes, I will definitely make a YouTube video of the occasion.

Final Thoughts

IMG_20160524_105644361 (2)I think it’s safe to say that this radio lives up to the hype. Its sensitive enough to hear KKDA out of Dallas on 730 kHz, but has a strong enough front end that I’m not swamped by a couple of strong, local stations. The synch detector is nothing short of remarkable, and it all comes in a relatively compact package. While the linear dial takes some getting used to, the tuning light is pretty handy, and you can pack your own flashlight to see where you’re tuning. Is it going to replace the perseus and the SAL-30? Of course not! But the SAL won’t fit in a small book bag either.

I’ve had a lot of fun with this radio the last few weeks, and I highly recommend picking one up.

Summer Nights and My Radio

r-donaldLike a lot of people from my generation, my first exposure to radio came through the AM broadcast band. In fact, my first radio was a Donald Duck AM only radio that I got from Disneyland. At night, I would fall asleep listening to far off cities like Chicago, or Cincinnati. Later, I found an old transistor radio (a Viscount 12 transistor model) that viscountI used to carry around with me in my coat pocket. I taped a piece of paper to the back of it, and would write down what station I heard and where it was on that tiny dial.

Lately, I’ve been taking advantage of the cool, late spring evenings to get out of the radio room and away from all its technology (‘Take the night off, SAL. We’re good’), and get back to the basics; just a flashlight, radio, the AM Radio Log from the National Radio Club, and myself hanging out, and seeing what I can hear.

One of the nice things about the AM broadcast band is that you don’t need a lot of advanced technology to hear a surprising number of stations from all across the country. Of course that technology helps mind you, but its not critical. All you really need is a decent AM radio (see Jay Allen’s awesome blog for a great shootout review of AM portables, both past and present. and a quiet location to hear stations from all over the country. Atlanta, St. Louis, and Denver pop up here just about every night, but you never know what will pop up. While Atlanta may be the usual station on 750 kHz, sometimes Radio Caracas out of Venezuela will be there instead. Other times, all it takes is a turn of the radio to bring in a completely different station. here at my location, 1430 is usually dominated by KASI out of Ames. If I turn the radio so that it faces to the Southeast though, I hear the oldies station KZQZ out of St. Louis.

IMG_20160524_105644361 (1)My radio of choice for these adventures has been my new toy, the Sony ICF-EX5MkII. It’s been a lot of fun getting to know this little marvel of technology, and so far I’ve been very impressed. Its been more difficult than I imagined getting used to an analog dial again, let alone one that is linear like the one on the EX5, but I’m starting to get the hang of it.  Expect a review somewhere down the road. For now though, I’m just happy to enjoy the weather, the stars, and whatever happens to make its way to Central Iowa on the Am dial.

Summertime, and the living is easy.

 

Consumer Alert: A Rare Sony Portable Available on Amazon.

icf-ex5mk2For those who are into mediumwave DX, you are probably aware of the Japanese only Sony portable called the ICF-EX5MkII. This radio, available online from sellers in Japan, is reported to offer outstanding performance and one of the best synchronous detectors you will find in any radio. While it does have some shortwave capabilities, they are extremely limited. In fact, the radio is designed so that you can only hear a handful of pre-programmed Radio Nikkei frequencies.

I’ve been intrigued by this radio and its prececessor for many years now, ever since I heard about them on Radio Netherlands’ Media Network. Of course, back when that show aired in the early 90s, any radio intended for the Japanese market only might as well been made of unobtanium here in the US. Later, when I read about this radio on Jay Allen’s excellent blog, I was impressed by his review, but now I had another problem: the price.$160 seems pretty steep for an AM/FM portable, not to mention the two week delivery period that it will take to arrive at your door. The itch remained unscratched.

Needless to say I was more than pleased to discover this radio is available on Amazon for $115.99, over $40 cheaper than the lowest priced model on eBay. Best of all, its eligible for free shipping through Amazon Prime. In other words, it was time to scratch this old itch and hit the add to cart button. If the shipping gods comply with their end of the bargain, it should be arriving sometime this week, probably Wednesday. I’ll give you my impressions of this radio here soon.

And yes, I will be hooking it up the SAL-30 just to put those Radio Nikkei frequencies to good use.

Some Odds and Ends

Some Loggings

The SAL-30 in all its glory.
The SAL-30 in all its glory.

Here’s a few loggings I made this morning between 1030 and 1140 UTC. I apologize for a lack of exact times for each log entry, but I tend to bounce around a lot from frequency to frequency in the mornings. A lack of coffee might have had something to do with it as well.

VL8A and VL8K were both stronger than earlier this week on 2325 and 2485 respectfully, with VL8K coming up to listenable levels.

RRI Makassar was audible on 4750, but with lots of OTH radar interference. Music and an OM announcer.

NBC Bougainville is strong on 3325, with music and OM announcer.

Some audio from Pyongyang Broadcasting on 3320 around local sunrise (1051 UTC)  but it sank back down into the mud pretty quickly

The Solomon Islands on 5020 are weaker than earlier this week at an S6, with interference from R. Rebelde on 5025. I can see a signal on 5006, possibly JG2XA,  but never managed to hear a Morse code ID.

No trace of The Cross on 4755*, and maybe a hint of a carrier from T8WH Palau on 9930. I could see a fairly strong carrier on 4750, but no audio managed to pop out of the noise.

*Since I wrote this, I have learned that PMA The Cross has been off the air since last May’s typhoon. While they have restored power to the FM transmitter, they are not currently operating on shortwave.

Dayton

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Me on the couch, giving the Perseus its first ‘kick the tires’ test. Note the SX-62a on the table that was later used in the pinup photo shoot.

Unfortunately, Dayton wasn’t in the cards for this year, but my friend and I are already making plans to attend next year. I can’t wait to burn myself to a crisp out in the tailgating parking lot, getting lost in the maze that is the Hara Arena, and spending entirely more money than I should. Until then though I’ll just have to sit tight and see what big announcements will be made at this year’s Hamvention. We’ve already seen Elecraft announce the KX2, will any of the big three follow suit?

DX News

While it may not be news to some of you, I just heard about a new DX target out of Australia. The station, known as RadioDX for the time being, should be ready to test on 5045 kHz within the next month and a half. They’ll only be transmitting with a kilowatt of power, so it will be quite the challenge to hear them in North America. Not quite on the level of the now defunct Radio Symban, but close. Keep your ears open.

Contest?

While your ears are busy listening for RadioDX, keep your eyes on hfradioreview. We’ll be having our first ever radio contest in the next few months, so be sure to watch for that. All I will say about it right now is that it involves baseball.

Stay tuned.

Fresh Catches from this Morning

The SAL-30 has been up and operational for about ten days now, but I haven’t really had a chance to put it through its paces. Not so much out of laziness, but more out of timing. Summer is not DX season in North America, expecially for the frequencies where this antenna excels. Aside from distant static crashes, there’s usually just not a lot to hear. Or is there?

Over the last week or so, I’ve managed to get some S9 signals out of Sonder Grense on 3320, as well as a couple of appearances by Radio Candip on 5066.4. Sure the bands were noisy, but Sonder Grense was a strong S9+, while Radio Candip was an S7 to 8. While SG is a pretty consistent catch here, its not usually that strong. Radio Candip, on the other hand, isn’t a station I hear very often at all. If I could hear both of these stations at decent levels with the new SAL, I wondered what else I could hear? I made a mental note to check the bands the next morning I happened to wake up early, and went about the rest of my evening.

SIFTW

I found myself awake this morning at around 5 AM local, or 10 hours UTC. In my half asleep state, I reached over to the Palstar r30cc radio that sits next to the bed and made my way through some of the programmed frequencies. The Australian domestics were sort of audible, but weak. No need to get out of bed for them. A quick spin of the dial later and I’m hearing English on 3325. Wait, English on 3325? Am I dreaming?  I’m still not sure about that, but it did convince me to get out of bed and in front of the radios to see what was going on.

Here’s some clips of what I heard this morning.

3325 Khz, NBC Bougainville, Papua, New Guinea. i always have trouble telling NBC and RRI apart, I’m leaning towards New Guinea on this one. I did hear a few English phrases thrown into the conversation (see the second video), as well as what I think was a discussion of Christianity, two things I don’t associate with Indonesia. Feel free to correct me if I am wrong. By the way, I expect YouTube to drop the copyright hammer on the first video shortly, so catch it while you can.

3905 KHz, RRI Marauke, indonesia. Again, another chance for me to brush up on my lacking ability to tell the difference between NBC and RRI. I’m going with RRI on this one though. While it doesn’t appear in this video, Shazam was able to identify a pop an Indonesian pop song from a band called Cokelat. Thank you, Shazam!

Of course, the HAM QRM picked up right before I recorded this, but you get the idea.

SIBC, 5020 KHz, Solomon Islands. I don’t hear the Solomon Islands very often, so its always good to catch them at a nice level like this. What really has me intrigued though is that little carrier wave on 5006 KHz. The schedules show that it could be H3A out of Tokyo, but it was well past local sunrise by now, so it never got any stronger. This one is definitely on my target list of stations to check for.

All in all, this was a morning worth losing sleep over. While the Aussies never did materialize on 2325 and 2485, VL8A was pretty loud on 4835, even with WWCR blasting away on 4840. Japan’s Nikkei 1 and 2 were both strong on 3925 and 3945 as well. Even Voice of the People was audible over the North Korean jammers on 3912. there were so many targets this morning that I forgot to check for TW8H, and the cross. I guess I’ll be getting up early again tomorrow.

As Steve McCroskey would’ve said in the movie Airplane!, “Looks like I picked the wrong week to cut out caffeine.”

Getting Ready for the SAL-30

After coming home Friday to find a box of antenna parts from Array Solutions on my front porch, the heavens opened up, and rained out any antenna construction plans I may have had. The good news is that I’ll be ready to go on Saturday, armed with everything I’ll need to get the new and improved SAL-30 up in the air by sunset.*

500 foot spool of 12 gauge wire: CHECK! The standard kit comes with 24 gauge, but I used 12 gauge when I put it up originally, so I’m sticking with it. unlike the loops on the SAL-20, which were constructed with 65 feet of wire each, the SAL-30 will be using a whopping 95 feet for each loop. That’s a lot of wire!

Replacement mast poles: CHECK! Since the SAL series of antennas requires a fiberglass mast, and will not work with aluminum, I bought replacements for the ones Fido destroyed. I should have an extra section when I’m done.

Guy rope and tensioners: CHECK! The SAL-30 kit came with enough guy rope for two levels of guys for the mast, as well as enough to support the loops itself. they also included eight tensioners, which is handy as well. Let’s hope I don’t screw up with the cuts.

New support stakes: CHECK! I decided to beef up the stakes I was using with more heavy duty supports.

Cable ties: CHECK! Cable ties are the duct tape of amateur radio. They’ll come in handy during the initial construction phase.

Heatshrink tubing, and insulators: CHECK! Heatshrink tubing is a Godsend to HAMs, almost as useful as cable ties for antenna projects. I actually have dogbone insulators for this job, although the makeshift PVC pipe sections I used for the SAL-20 worked just fine.

Soldering gun and solder: CHECK! Actually, I better double check this when I get home. i might need to get another tip for the Weller.

Nice weather: CHECK? If the forecasters are to be believed, we are supposed to be in the seventies this Saturday, with a 40% chance of afternoon thunderstorms. I’m not crazy about the 19 mph wind, but well, welcome to Iowa.

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Dude, you go ahead and get the antenna up. I’ll stay here and guard the couch. could you hand me the TV remote before you go please?

So the stage is set, and I am very anxious to see if this new antenna can hear. If I don’t screw anything up, and the thunderstorms stay away until Saturday night, I should be ready to put this new antenna through its paces early next week.

Now if my helper was as enthused about this project as I am.

*I say this knowing full well that it is not true. As with all of my projects, I am certain there will be at least one trip to the hardware store for things I didn’t anticipate, I just don’t know what those things are yet. It would also be a good idea to mow the lawn before getting this beast up, as it will make my life easier in the long run. Hopefully I can get that done before Saturday.

Radio Silence

Testing, testing. Is this thing on?

In retrospect, maybe it wasn’t my best decision to start airing commercials for HF Radio Review on The Mighty KBC the same week I tried to switch to a new web hosting company. In fact it was a terrible idea, but it just sort of happened that way anyways. I should know very well that these things are never quick and painless, but it would be different with my own website right? Right?? Wrong!

The good news is that, after a lot of hard work, HF Radio Review is back up, and open for business once again.

Now if I could only say the same for my SAL-20.

About two weeks ago, the unthinkable happened when my neighbor’s dog (who would make a fine rug by the way) took off after a squirrel and brought down the SAL-20 antenna. While that is annoying in itself, he also managed to crack several sections of mast AND ripped one of the loops completely out of the guy ring. This wasn’t going to be a simple put it back up kind of operation, this was going to need a complete rebuild.

And since I was going to have to rebuild it, I decided to take this opportunity to upgrade it as well. Ten days after making the call to Array Solutions, the Big Brown Truck delivered all of the parts I will need to rebuild the SAL-20 as its big brother, the SAL-30. I was very eager to get this beast up and running this weekend, but the weatherman has other ideas, as we can expect a soaking rain to move in tonight and stay all weekend. Should I have expected anything different? Expect a blog about hilarity that is sure to ensue.

By the way, if you have the recources, I’d like to encourage you to give what you can to the Mighty KBC. Dave Mason and Uncle Eric Van Willegen are truly trying to keep music on shortwave alive, and I hope you’ll help them in the fight. Every Euro counts, so please, give what you can to keep the farts blasting into the stratosphere.

It’s good to be back.

#WEFAXWednesday

As you all should know by now, I have a,  *AHEM*, thing for weather faxes. I decided to celebrate this little obsession of mine by creating Weather Fax Wednesday, also known as #WEFAXWednesday on Twitter. If you decode a cool looking weather fax, post it to Twitter using this tag so others can check it out. While it would help if you post them on a Wednesday, I’m sure no one will mind if you post them on another day of the week.

Here’s a few I posted to the @hfradio1 Twitter feed today. All decodes were done using fldigi and a Microtelecom Perseus.

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Port Reyes, CA shows a storm rolling in from the Pacific. 
wefax_20160120_141119_0_ok
Another infrared satellite photo. This one is from New Orleans. 
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A composite of the Eastern and Western Pacific charts as transmitted out of Point Reyes, CA
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Another IR satellite (I like those) photo as transmitted out of Boston. 
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A weather chart from Valparaiso Playa Ancha, Chile.
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An IR sat photo from Chile, and probably the best decode I’ve ever gotten from there. 

Happy #WEFAXWednesday everyone!

Decoding Multiple Weather Faxes at a Time

A screen shot of the Elad FDM-S2 receiver receiving three weather fax stations at one time.
A screen shot of the Elad FDM-S2 receiver receiving three weather fax stations at one time.

Recently, I’ve been having some fun decoding High Frequency Data Links (HFDL), a protocol that is used to track aircraft as they fly around the world. While doing some research on how this is done, I stumbled across a great article by Nils Schiffhauer, DK8OK, on how to decode multiple HFDL signals at one time using the 4 sub receivers of the Elad FDM-S2. By following his tutorial, I was able to set up my Elad to decode three HFDL signals at one time, and plot them all on Google Earth. While this is pretty cool, and I encourage everyone reading this to give it a try, it got me to thinking about how I could apply Neil’s efforts to something a little closer to my own heart: weather faxes.

As you probably know, I have a, ahem, thing for weather faxes, especially the infrared satellite photos. If you haven’t tried to decode them before, I strongly encourage you to read this first. For those of you who have been doing this a while, keep in mind that this quick tutorial is written from the point of view of an Elad FDM-S2 user. I’m sure you can take the same general principles and apply to any SDR that allows multiple sub-receivers though. You may have to adapt the virtual audio cable (VAC) settings to whatever program you’re using as well, but again the underlying logic is the same.

VACs
Make sure you have enough VACs to go around.

Step 1: Make sure you have enough virtual audio cables. Usually, all of my projects come to a screeching halt when I realize I am a cable short. Fortunately for me, this one requires cables that you can create on the fly. You can see in this image that I have created five virtual audio cables: for are for our project, while the extra one is for the Perseus. That way I can use both SDRs without them getting each other’s way.

Elad vac config
Pair up each cable with a receiver.

Step 2: Go to the Audio setup of the Elad. This is where we will put our VACs to good use. As you can see from the picture, I have assigned each of the Elad’s virtual receivers it’s own VAC, starting with cable two and going through cable five. Remember, I have one cable (cable 1) set aside for the Perseus, but you can change this to fit your needs.

Step 3: Set up the receivers and decoders.  Starting with the first sub receiver, set it up to receive your weather fax station of choice. In my case, that’s Point Reyes on 12786. Next, I open up Fldigi and go to the sound card under the configure tab. There, change the capture pull down box to select Line 2 and hit close. fldigi configGo ahead and make whatever fine tuning adjustments you need to make to either Fldigi or the Elad until you start to see a decode come through. Once you’re seeing something come through on the display, go ahead and hit save on the decode, and send it to whatever directory you’d like. In my case, I set up individual directories for Point Reyes, Kodiak, Boston, and New Orleans. Not only will it keep things organized, you’ll also avoid the unlikely risk of accidentally overwriting an existing file.

Step 4: Repeat step 3 for each of your virtual receivers. Go ahead and set up the second Elad receiver for your target station, and then open up a separate instance of Fldigi. Once it’s open, go to the sound card configuration and set it up for the corresponding audio cable. In my setup, the second receiver is paired up with cable 3, so I’d pull down the capture box and set it for cable 3. Once that’s done, make your fine tuning adjustments as needed, and save whatever’s come through on the decoder to the directory of your choice, just like you did with the first receiver. Then you can finish up by configuring receivers three and four the same way. Keep in mind that every instance of Fldigi will need to be paired up with a different receiver and VAC for this to work properly. I chose these four stations because they are close enough together to fit inside the bandwidth of the Elad. I would’ve loved to have chosen Honolulu over Kodiak, but I can’t grab their signal and Point Reyes/New Orleans at the same time. Depending upon your flavor of SDR, your mileage may vary.

Putting It All Together.

A couple of notes about getting this all to work. While I am sure other decoders besides Fldigi are capable of doing this, I haven’t ran across any just yet. Sorcerer, my go to for WEFAX decodes these days, and will allow you to open multiple sessions, but it will not allow you to set a different VAC feed for each of these sessions.  If anyone knows of a work around for this, or a different decoder that will let me do this, I’d like to hear from you.

EDIT: Since I wrote this, I have come to realize that, when I am using Fldigi as my decoder, I seem to spend a lot less time in Photoshop piecing these things back together again. They always just seem to line up correctly in Fldigi, which is more than I can say for most of the other decoders out there. The only problem I have with Fldigi is that it tends to turn a single weather fax decode into several files that then have to be combined later. Not a huge deal, but sometimes there will be a gap between the two that cannot be filled. If the Fldigi team can get that worked out, your choice of decoder becomes a no brainer.

Also, since these signals are probably coming to you from different directions, you’re also going to want an antenna that is fairly omni-directional. I went ahead and connected the Elad directly to my long wire, which is far less directional than the SAL-20, for this very reason. It also lets me switch directional patterns without messing up any decodes that may be in progress, giving me the freedom to chase other things with the Perseus without messing up any decodes in progress on the Elad. How slick is that?

Here’s a couple of decodes taken simultaneously from New Orleans and Point Reyes:

wefax_20151027_091126_10000_nocorr
The 1400 UTC WEFAX transmission out of New Orleans, LA on October 27th, 2015.
The 1403 WEFAX transmission out of Point Reyes, California from October 27th, 2015.
The 1403 UTC WEFAX transmission out of Point Reyes, CA on October 27th, 2015.
The 1414 UTC WEFAX transmission out of Point Reyes, CA on October 27th, 2015.
The 1414 UTC WEFAX transmission out of Point Reyes, CA on October 27th, 2015.

As you can see, it’s working pretty well!

Again, many thanks to DK8OK for giving me the idea to try this out. Thanks to him I’ll never have to choose between the Boston sat photo at 1400 and the Point Reyes sat photo at 1403 ever again. Now if you’ll excuse me, I need to go buy a larger hard drive.

Howard

Back when I was a poor college student, my roommate and I went into a local DC liquor store to do some competitive price checking. While we didn’t find the prices to be all that good, I was shocked to find something else: radios. One of the guys who ran the store, a ham by the name of Howard, fixed up and sold old radios out of the back, so the shelves were full of wine, liquor, and shortwave sets. I quickly became friends with Howard, and ended up buying a couple of radios from him before I graduated, including an old Delmonico and a Hallicrafters S-77.

Fast forward to the spring of 93, when I am now a poor college grad working at a shitty job in Baltimore. I didn’t have a lot of money, but I couldn’t resist making the trip down to DC to see Howard and his radios. What I found there on that Saturday was the most amazing radio I’d ever seen: a Hallicrafters SX-73. The mother of an Ex would describe it later as a ‘big, ugly box’ (and believe me, this woman knew all about being big and ugly), but it was beyond beautiful to my eyes. I didn’t know much about it, but I knew it would be going home with me if I could afford it. When Howard told me he wanted $75 for it, we made the deal and I started the process of lugging it back home. I got some funny looks on the train that day, but I didn’t care. I was a very happy man.

My SX-73 in my basement apartment. The HQ-140XA was also acquired from Howard as well.
My SX-73 in my basement apartment. The HQ-140XA was also acquired from Howard as well.

Of course, that radio became my go to receiver, and I made a lot of catches with that beast, including my first pirate on 7415 (WKIK). One thing I didn’t expect though was the reaction I got from people when I told them I had an SX-73 at home. Dealers at hamfests or on the phone would fall all over themselves trying to get me to sell or trade it to them. I never took them up on their offer, but it made me start to wonder just what I had here. This was in the days before the internet (yes, there was a time when the internet didn’t exist), so I just kept politely declining their offers, and I kept listening to the bands on my “Big Hal”.

It wasn’t until a few years later that I found out the back story to this radio, and why everyone was so interested in it. After making a post to a news group about the rig, a man replied and filled me in. It turns out these radios were only made between 1952 and 1954, and cost a whopping $975 bucks new. Needless to say they didn’t make a lot of them, and were considered to be the second most rare of all the Hallicrafters. He ad vised me that, if I were to sell it, I could probably walk out of the deal with about $750.

Wow, that’s a lot of money for a broke 25 year old. That could buy a lot of computer parts, ore even a new radio. But the more I thought about it, the more I came to realize that Howard knew very well that radio was worth a lot more than $75. Rather than getting full value for it though, he was willing to practically give it away to a kid who loved radio, and who would put it to good use. Yeah, I could sell it and make a handsome profit, but it just didn’t feel right. Now I know that this is what Elmers do, they hook up those just getting into the hobby, and give them a way in.

Today, that liquor store is a Domino’s pizza place, and I’ve long since lost touch with Howard, but I still have that old SX-73, and she still works. She doesn’t get used much anymore, but it’s still one of my prized possessions.

So here’s to you, Howard. Thanks for giving the 23 year old me a break.